Netflix releases ‘To All the Boys: Always and Forever’ to eager audiences

 Lara Jean Covey (Lana Condor) holds her five love letters she sent out in the first movie. The final work of the series was released Feb. 12, on Netflix. Lara Jean is the main protagonist in the story.

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Lara Jean Covey (Lana Condor) holds her five love letters she sent out in the first movie. The final work of the series was released Feb. 12, on Netflix. Lara Jean is the main protagonist in the story.

The To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before series had its third and final installment released Feb. 12, on Netflix. The three movies are based on the books by Jenny Han. Many people have been following the main character Peter Kavinsky (Noah Centineo) and Lara Jean Covey (Lana Condor) from the first movie, which was released in 2018. In the first movie, Peter and Lara Jean started “fake dating” due to Lara Jean’s little sister, Kitty Covey (Anna Cathcart), sending out love letters Lara Jean had written. The movie concluded with Peter and Lara Jean becoming a real couple when the two realized they had feelings for one another. In the second, To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before: P.S. I Still Love You, their relationship was threatened then strengthened. The name of the third move is To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before: Always and Forever, which was a wholesome end to the series.    

To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before: Always and Forever begins by re-introducing the two main characters, Peter Kavinsky and Lara Jean Covey. The conflict is introduced early, which is that Peter had gotten into Stanford University, but Lara Jean had been rejected. The movie goes on to show how the couple goes about piloting the problem and how they come to a resolution that benefits both of them. 

The To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before series is a very wholesome, feel-good story. The teen romance displays problems on screen that are dealt with in a healthy way after the real relationship had started, resulting in a typical happy ending.

 “When I look for each watch, usually I look for funny movies and romantic comedies are one of my favorites because you get a little bit of romance and a little bit of comedy. I love that,” junior Tori Riehle said. “I feel like the series really shows that, because there’s funny aspects to it and there is always a cute little ending.”

The movies are portrayed in a lighthearted fashion but the romantic relationships do not exactly key up with reality. Nevertheless, the science behind romance movies allows people to confront feelings and connect with what is happening on screen.

I think you can learn about something from everything around you. You can learn from the people you are watching.”

— Kris McCarthy

Freshman Ava Weiss’s favorite element of the To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before series is how the relationships are romanticized. Even though it is not like that in real life, Weiss enjoys it in movies.  

The work contains unexpected plot twists as well, and including these elements deepens the story. These give viewers a chance to take a side in the movie.

“At the beginning like the first movie, Peter, he had nothing to do with Lara Jean. And then, her sister sent out the letters and so now he’s kind of intrigued. They end up falling for each other and they are a super cute couple,” Riehle explained. “In the second movie when Lara Jean gets another letter from John Ambrose (Jordan Fisher) it creates a love triangle. Ultimately in the end she chooses Peter.” 

All three movies have a relevant lesson they teach, which would be honesty is the best policy. Majority of the conflicts that come about in the story are due to the characters not being straightforward and honest with one another.

“I think you can learn about something from everything around you,” social studies teacher Kris McCarthy said. “You can learn from the people you are watching.” 

One thing viewers do not see throughout the movies is the perspective of Peter. The movies are from the perspective of Lara Jean, and her thoughts cloud the work. Viewers never get to see Peter’s side of things during conflicts between the two.

Riehle thought that hearing from Petercould have improved the story. I want to hear from his side, and I want to hear him explaining things.”

The final installment of the series, To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before: Always and Forever, was a wholesome end to the story. The movie combined all the important aspects of the previous two into one. To those who have been following the story of Peter Kavinsky and Lara Jean Covey from the beginning, this conclusion will not disappoint.