One Act play competes annually

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Photo submitted by Ivy Lariviere

One Act play team practices in the auditorium after school.

Ava Hoelzel, Photography Editor

Every year, the One Act cast competes between different schools in the district, and then at state level. The have about one month to put the production together. The cast/crew consists of no more than 20 members (students and advisors). “I always learn so much in these competitive environments,” senior Ivy Lariviere said. “I love putting my mind and body to work, and that definitely happens in One Act competitions.”

The cast practices every day after school for about a month. Their schedule changes, and hours lengthen as the competition date comes closer. 

“We’re going to practice pretty much every day, 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, but not everybody has to be here all the time,” explained theater director Grif Sadow.

Usually in a play there are lots of people involved, but for the One Act they are only allowed a certain amount. 

“We’re only able to have 20 members of the team that do everything from all that performing to all the technical elements,” Sadow said.

There are many rules because it is a competition. Anything from how many people are involved, to the length of the play, is regulated. Information about the performance, such as the title, storyline and characters can not be shared. 

“The One Act part of the Minnesota State High School League activities. So we’re bound by certain rules,” Sadow said. “Because it’s competitive, we can’t really publicize it because it. It has to be anonymous in the competition.”

It is a long road to competition, and it’s a lot of work, but we are rewarded in having the amazing ability to represent our school’s theatre department and show our talent to other departments across the state.”

— Ivy Lariviere

A variety of students are involved, students who are new to theater, and others who have spent years with the theater department. All are welcomed to participate. 

“I have all different types of students, students that have been a part of the department, like all their high school, we have some new students that are just starting with us,” Sadow said.

To compete they must have a 35 minute play. For this to happen, Sadow takes a normal play and condenses it to down to make it shorter. He then, must have it approved by the writer of the play. 

“We are doing a play that’s normally over two hours, and we have to cut it down for the rules to be 35 minutes,” Sadow said. 

The play for the One Act this year will be the third one they have tried to get permission for. Because of this, they are slightly behind schedule. 

“The first play, we cut it, and the playwright didn’t approve it so we didn’t get permission. The second play, it needed a very diverse cast. And so we tried to recruit more diversity, or even more diversity than we have, and that didn’t work out. So then we had to pick another play based on who was interested in who came out in auditions,” Sadow said. 

Subsections and semifinals are open to the public. The first round of subsections takes place at school and White Bear Lake High School. Different schools will perform about every 45 minutes. Performances start at 3 p.m. with a $5 admission.  

“It’s like any other competitive activity in the school,” Sadow said. “It’d be great to have a strong support of the high school and community to come. Cheer us on to state.”

Sadow said he has a very great and talented team this year.

I always look forward to show-time,” Lariviere said. “It is a long road to competition, and it’s a lot of work, but we are rewarded in having the amazing ability to represent our school’s theatre department and show our talent to other departments across the state.”