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Politicians battle for stronger healthcare bill

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With the failure of the Graham Cassidy Bill, many are wondering what comes next in the debate surrounding government provided healthcare.  It is extremely important to understand this debate if America is to protect both the health and the liberty of American citizens.

While its importance is undeniable, the issue of healthcare is not easy to understand.  Democrats and Republicans have been fighting each other, as well as members of their own parties, to settle on a plan that makes at least most of America happy.  In essence, the debate is over how much state governments should grant easy access to healthcare to lower class citizens at the cost of the middle and upper classes.

“This is an issue between liberty and security,” teacher Roger Stippel said.  “What is the right amount of government that we are providing security but not infringing on liberty?”

Obviously both liberty and security are important.  Liberty is what has always made the United States unique and great, but security of the rights of the people is also extremely critical.  The goal of the healthcare debate should be to settle on a bill that balances both of these values.

The Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, favored security over liberty.  Some pieces of the ACA make sense, such as the protection of people with preexisting conditions, making healthcare more accessible to people in poverty, and allowing children to stay under their parent’s plan until they are 26 years old.  

Citizens should be protected from discrimination due to preexisting conditions simply to protect their human rights.  Insurance companies should not be legally allowed to discriminate against anyone, regardless of gender, race, or preexisting conditions.  These human rights should also protect people in poverty by allowing them to have healthcare that may not be provided by their employers.  Children under the age of 26 should be protected as well.  In college and post-college, young people should not be forced to deal with healthcare bills or the potentially devastating consequences of not having healthcare.  This is especially important to students today, because they will lose their right to be protected by their parent’s plan if the ACA is replaced.

However, some parts of the ACA are unnecessarily restrictive.  To be specific, the ACA places taxes and restrictions on health care plans that many middle class Americans currently pay for.  

“My cousin, he’s 28, so he just got past that age where he needs to get his own [health care], and actually at first he didn’t buy insurance, he had to pay the fine, just because with him insurance premiums would be higher than the fine he’d have to pay,” senior Adam Johnson said.

My cousin, he’s 28, so he just got past that age where he needs to get his own [health care], and actually at first he didn’t buy insurance, he had to pay the fine, just because with him insurance premiums would be higher than the fine he’d have to pay.”

— Adam Johnson

Access to healthcare is a right and a privilege that most the country embraces.  This does not mean that everyone should be forced into taking advantage of that right.  The ACA requires American citizens to pay for certain health care plans deemed “adequate,” or face a heavy tax penalty.  This means many middle class citizens are paying thousands more for a health care plan that the government tells them they need, or face being criminalized by a tax bump.

“We need to look at Obamacare and see the flaws instead of saying that it’s a flawed system and we need to get rid of it.  Where can we build on this?  What can we build upon to make this system work for everyone?” Johnson said.

The ACA clearly has flaws, but it is a start towards a health care policy that will make members of both the right and left happy.  Over the next few years, Democrats and Republicans need to work towards a bipartisan health care system that makes healthcare easy to obtain and access, but does not force it upon citizens who do not want it.

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4 Comments

4 Responses to “Politicians battle for stronger healthcare bill”

  1. Abby Banks on November 11th, 2017 8:59 pm

    This is awesome! I really like the way you were able to break down complex topics into more easily understandable chunks. However, your nutgraph needs to be more in-depth, and punctuation in quotes still needs to obey that of all the rest of the article, so avoid run-on sentences. Adam’s first quote should be two separate sentences. Other than that, great job!

    [Reply]

  2. Paxton Watson on November 12th, 2017 1:43 pm

    I like how you made the article easy for someone to understand even if they didn’t know anything about healthcare. I also really enjoyed the picture I think it was a nice touch!

    [Reply]

  3. Josefina Scherek on November 12th, 2017 9:06 pm

    It was really easy to detect your views and side you choose to write about! Your understanding on the issue is very clear and you have very detailed ideas and paragraphs. Great work!!!

    [Reply]

  4. Max Kennedy on November 14th, 2017 9:40 pm

    You brought down a complicated issue into a comprehensible argument and stated sides and their opinions. I thought it was great you tried to take the high road and find a logical way to persuade people.

    [Reply]

The Pony Express intends for this area to be used to foster healthy thought-provoking discussion. Comments are expected to adhere to the standards of the Pony Express and to be respectful and constructive. Furthermore, we do not permit any of the following inappropriate content including: Libel or defamatory statements, any copyrighted, trademarked, or intellectual property of others, the use of profanity and foul language or personal attacks. All comments are reviewed and approved by staff to ensure that they meet the standards of this publication. The Pony Express does not allow anonymous comments. We require a name and valid email address submitted. This email address will not be displayed but will be used to confirm your comments. Online comments that are found in violation of these policies will be removed as quickly as possible.

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Politicians battle for stronger healthcare bill